Review: Black Swan Affair by K.L. Kreig

Review: Black Swan Affair by K.L. KreigBlack Swan Affair October 17, 2016
Genres: Contemporary Romance
Pages: 370
Format: eBook
Source: Purchased
Amazon US
Goodreads

I’ve loved him as long as I can remember.

The gangly boy with big brown eyes and unruly hair who grew up into an intoxicating man. He wears scruff like he invented it and ambles with a swagger that makes panties drop.

Killian Shepard.

Shep.

We grew up together. We played Ghost in the Graveyard. Had our own rock band. It didn’t matter that he was five years older than me. It didn’t matter that he looked at me as a kid sister even as I grew into woman. It didn’t even matter when he left me behind to go to college and start his adult life.

He’d be back.
He was always meant to be mine.

He came back, all right. But instead of smelling of promises, he stunk of betrayal. And he destroyed me—us—the day he married my sister instead of me.

So I did the only thing a girl like me in my position could do.

I got my revenge.
I married his brother, Kael.
Now we’re one big happy f*cking family.

I’m not sure I’ve ever read a more convoluted story. I’m absolutely sure I’ve never read one with more nicknames.

Maverick (Mavs, Mavericky, Small Fry, Swan) has always been in love with Killian (Shep). He’s in love with her too, they have plans together, until he leaves town to become his ‘own man’ and when he returns it’s with the announcement that he will be marrying Mav’s sister, Jillian (Jilly, half of the “Illians” – yes…she shipped her characters). Killian won’t say why he’s marrying Jillian and in her own childish, snitty, revengeful ways, Maverick decides to to accept a marriage proposal from Killian’s brother Kael, (one of the few characters in the book who is sans a nickname) who has been in love with her for forever. 

Got that? Settle in, we’re just getting started.

I think this was supposed to be a story about Maverick finding out what love really is. It was not that for me. What this was for me, was a story about a bunch of selfish and ridiculous people. So, let me break it down for you a little.

Maverick grew up with Kael and his older brother Killian. As said, she has been in love with Killian since she was a girl. However, Kael is her best friend. Always been there for her, no matter what.  Here lies my first problem with the story. You don’t marry your best friend, knowing you are in love with someone else. Especially, his own brother. In my opinion, that makes you a horrible person. Kreig writes the story in a way to try to make you see that Kael wooed her, which he did attempt to do. But Maverick is constantly reminding the reader that she still loves Killian. Horrible person. I can’t get past that.

Adding to this horrible person theory, the first time she interacts with her best girl friend, she’s not kind to her either. Thinks about MaryLou’s (ML) voice as being grating and saying she needs a makeover. I had immediate unkind feelings toward Maverick as a character, which makes it very difficult to sympathize with her.

Furthermore, Kael is amazing. Kael seems to be the kind of man everyone should wish for. He was kind and caring and sexy and would do anything for Maverick. This makes Maverick even less appealing.

As the story progresses, so do her feelings for Kael. Yet, she still continues to remind us that she loves Killian. Something I could never understand. There were no scenes in this book that gave me that ‘Aha!’ moment of understanding WHY she loved him.  Not one. Again, how am I supposed to sympathize with her?

Then, after a really long time and whole lot of nonsense nicknames, you get to the big reveal. The ultimate betrayal. The reason why Killian left her for her horrid human of a sister. If you asked me to pick one word to describe the big reveal, that would be easy. It’s a word in the first sentence of this review, it’s a word I will always associate with this book.  It’s convoluted. Incredibly convoluted.

The kicker for me though, is that after the big reveal, Maverick still doesn’t seem to get things. She was still concerned about picking a man and in my head, there was no choice there. One man did everything to protect her, one didn’t.

Aside from all the things I just listed that bothered me, there was something else I couldn’t get over. It’s the way I felt manipulated as a reader by some silly scenes. Scenes that didn’t need to be there, they had really nothing at all to do with the story. One is very early on in the book, one is very late in the book. I say manipulated because the one early on is only there to keep you wondering but later you realize it was not at all what you thought it was and was actually completely pointless.

Now, let’s get to the nickname thing. I have no problems with a nickname. A. One. This book is full of them. I’ve given you some already. We learn about a childhood friend, they call him “The Hole”. Sam is also Hamhock. The karaoke DJ in this small town of 5k people where everyone knows everyone is Johnny Littleton, let’s call him J Ton when he’s actually hosting karaoke though. The restaurant they eat at is The Red Rooster, aka The Bloody Cock – sounds appetizing, eh? There is a dude called One Nut. Patsy, a waitress, but we call her Pat. Sally, called Sal. Get the point? I sure don’t.

While I see the appeal of this story in the synopsis, it did not deliver for me what so ever. I’d like to give it a couple of stars just because I made it to the end, but I think I can contribute that to the manipulation. Kudos to the author for carefully plotting the chapters the way she did. I can concede that one thing.  I guess it can have a star for that and a star for ultimately picking the right guy, even if it was for the wrong reasons. 



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