Review: Imaginary Lines by Allison Parr

Series: New York Leopards #3
Release Date: April 14, 2014
Publisher: Carina Press
Genre: Adult Contemporary Romance
Source: Copy provided for honest review
Rating: ★★

Tamar Rosenfeld has
been in love with New York Leopards linebacker Abraham Krasner since
they were twelve years old. She’d always considered it destiny that
they’d end up together…until Abe was drafted and she professed her
feelings in a moment of blind excitement. The sting of his rejection was
like nothing she’d ever felt before, and it’s nothing she’ll ever
forget.
Older and wiser, Tamar has landed a dream job as a
reporter for one of New York’s premier athletic websites. Determined to
stop being the safe, boring girl she’s felt like for most of her life,
Tamar makes a list of all the things she wants to do and see in her new
city, and Getting Over Abraham is priority number one.
But
destiny has finally chosen to interfere. Just as Tamar’s decided to move
on, Abe’s realized she’s the only woman for him. When he confides the
truth, Tamar has to decide if she can put her crush behind her, or take a
chance on the very man who’s been holding her back all these years.

Sadly, I had a couple of issues with Imaginary Lines.  I very much enjoy the world of the New York Leopards and Abe has been an compelling character in the previous titles. However, my adoration for him was not enough of a beacon to shine through the dark spots.
Tamar and Abe grew up together, best friends with very close families.  Their mothers always envisioned they’d grow up, fall in love and marry.  Tamar always hoped for the same.  Her love for Abe was not returned though, instead heartbreak is what he handed her and for four years they avoided each other.
Now their worlds are thrown back together by careers and Abe is ready to dive into a relationship with Tamar, but the idea of another broken heart delivered by the man that ever held it, is scary enough to keep Abe at arms length.
That was the aspect of Imaginary Lines I really connected with. Friends to lovers is an idea I often gravitate too, it’s an idea I love…I think love should start with friendship.  And Abe…well, he would be an easy friend to love.
The adult Abraham is a pretty genuine guy.  He’s easy going but with his own small insecurities. He’s sweet but still strong. He’s a ‘guy’s guy’ that ladies love.  Abe has few faults.
Tamar is an easy character to understand. Having your dreams pinned on someone only to have them all crushed, would easily make you apprehensive if he eventually gave you the attention you had always hoped for.  Her desire to be with Abe and her fear of it were both easily felt.  Tamar, despite her insecurities, has a strength about her.  She’s willing to fight for her beliefs and for those she cares about and that helped me like her more.
So…that’s the good stuff.  But there were small things that kept throwing me off.  Keeping in mind that I was reading an advance review copy, perhaps some of those things were cleaned up before final publication.
My biggest issue is this:  Abe and Tamar are both Jewish, yet many times throughout the story they say God.  As an example, after they kiss at one point, Abe says something along the lines of  ‘Oh God, Tamar’.  Now, I don’t know many Jews – but I know they don’t say or even spell the name God. Right? That’s what I was always taught anyway.  I would let it slide if they seemed to be non-practicing Jews, but that isn’t really the case.
Again, maybe that was cleaned up before publication, but it really should have never been there in the first place.
Another issue I had was my constant questioning of everything that had to do with the relationship between the team and the reporters.  It just never felt fully believable to me.  Which caused me to pause multiple times and try google searching if that was really how shit worked.  It’s very difficult to lose yourself in a story if you are constantly fact checking.
Well, that’s my story… I think maybe it’s time for me to let this series go.  As much as I love a hot football player, I just need more authenticity in the story.


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